ANNUAL REPORTS

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 CRISP IN THE NEWS

 
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CRISP Reports

 
 
Credit: http://nyis.info

Credit: http://nyis.info

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Survey

CRISP partnered with The Nature Conservancy to perform a hemlock health and hemlock woolly adelgid survey throughout the largest hemlock stands in the Catskills. The results will be used to inform future biological control efforts and other conservation measures. Follow the link to a PDF report on our results!

Credit: www.valleynewslive.com

Credit: www.valleynewslive.com

 Aquatic Nuisance Species Survey

In partnership with Bill Harman at SUNY Oneonta, CRISP identified aggressive high threat aquatic nuisance species and took a survey of aquatic exotic species found in lakes and streams of the Catskill region during the summer of 2011.  

 Learn more here: Aquatic Invasive Species Inventory

See the final report here: Aquatic Invasive Species Report

Credit: http://www.english-country-garden.com

Credit: http://www.english-country-garden.com

Marsh Thistle Early Detection and Rapid Response

In partnership with SUNY Oneonta’s Biology Department, CRISP is responding to an early detection of an invasive plant that can take over wet meadows and roadsides.

Learn more here: Marsh Thistle Early Detection

Credit: http://www.witf.org

Credit: http://www.witf.org

Susquehanna River Assessment 

In partnership with Otsego County Conservation Association, CRISP is sponsoring a five-day paddle along the Susquehanna River from Cooperstown to Sidney mapping invasive aquatic species such as water chestnut and removing small pockets of the spot

Learn more here:Susquehanna River Assessment

Credit: https://www.northernvirginiamag.com

Credit: https://www.northernvirginiamag.com

Isolated Ash Grove Citizen Science Monitoring Project 

In partnership with Olive Natural Heritage Society, CRISP worked with volunteers to promote monitoring and stewardship of isolated first growth as stands at high elevations in the Catskills as possible refugee from the Emerald Ash Borer(EAB).

Learn more here:Isolated Ash Grove Monitoring

Credit: http://www.njnyhikes.com

Credit: http://www.njnyhikes.com

Invaders of Disturbed Areas Inventory

In partnership with Hudsonia, CRISP sponsored a survey of non-native invasive plants in the Catskills in order to assess the feasibility of using disturbed landscapes as sentinels for early detection of non-native plants. 

Learn more here: Invaders of Disturbed Areas